Women of Brazil

Women of Brazil

Experience alluring samba, bossa nova and more by a young generation of rising stars and new discoveries.
$14.98
1
Nossa Alma Canta - Bossanova - (Brazil)

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2
Graca Cunha - Saudade e Solidao - (Brazil)

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3
Clara Moreno - Blanco Zona Sul - (Brazil)

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4
Flavia Coelho - A Foto - (Brazil)

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5
Maguinha - Gema - (Brazil)

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6
Aline Morales - Pra Que Sambar - (Brazil)

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7
Luisa Maita - Mangue e Fogo - (Brazil)

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8
Juliana Kehl - Ele Nao Sabe Samba - (Brazil)

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9
Mart'nalia - Para Comigo - (Brazil)

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10
Miriam Aida - Por Causa de Voce Meninha - (Brazil)

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11
Miriam Maria - Boi de Haxixe - (Brazil)

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This album is also available on iTunes!

Review from World Music Wire:

Feminine Mystique: The sweet, sensual sounds of Brazilian female vocalists shine on Women of Brazil

From Carmen Miranda’s playful intensity in the 1940s and 50s and Astrud Gilberto’s sultry alto in the 1960s to today’s multi-talented young generation, the voices of Brazilian women have long shaped popular song worldwide. Through classic samba and bossa nova, female Brazilian vocalists have won a place in hearts across the planet.

Women of Brazil (Putumayo World Music; release: May 21, 2013) chronicles the rising stars and established voices of a scene as prolific as it is innovative, from philosophical sambas (Aline Morales’s “Pra Que Sambar”) to gentle electronic sounds, from the sway of bossa nova (Clara Moreno’s “Balanço Zona Sul”) to reggae vibes (Flavio Coehlo’s “A Foto”). The musicians featured on this album take the music of greats like Caetano Veloso and Jorge Ben, and create their own unique interpretations—or craft clever new songs, often with a wink to the classic Brazilian songbook.

“Part of the joy in Brazilian music is this ability to combine that sultry air with great melodies and intelligent lyrics,” reflects Putumayo’s founder and CEO Dan Storper, who faced the daunting task of picking tracks out of Brazil’s burgeoning contemporary music scene. To chronicle this scene further, Putumayo is releasing two updated versions of its successful collections of Brazilian music (Brazilian Lounge and Brazilian Beat). Read More


Review from Jazz Weekly:

If you want old school Brazilian, when bossa nova WAS a “new bump,” then this collection is going to want to walk the shores of Ipanema to find this release. Simple support by gentle guitars, sensitive percussion and little else except enticing voices by the likes of Luisa Maita (on “Mangue e Fogo”) or “Graca Cunha (“Saudade e Solidao”) will lull you into la-la land with the irresistible grooves. Nossa Alma Canta’s “Bossanova” will make you feel Jobim is back in the studio with quiet chords and quiet stars, and “Aline Morales’ “Pra Que Sambar” is a delectable delight. Lots to love here!

 

A Foto by Flavia Coelho

Catalog ID#: P330